VISUAL AIDS

 

As an audience-centered speaker, you will find presentation aids invaluable for five reasons:

 

1. Presentation aids enhance understanding, because of the five senses combined, visual learning is the most learnt, in part, because of television viewing.

 

2. Presentation enhances memory.

3. Presentation aids help listeners organize ideas.

4. Presentation aids help gain and maintain attention.

5. Presentation aids help illustrate a sequence of events or procedures

 

Presentation aids are grouped into three main categories:

 

Three-dimensional aids:

·        actual objects

·        models

·        people.

 

Two-dimensional aids:

·        Drawings

·        Photographs

·        Slides

·        Maps

·        Graphs

·        Charts

·        Flip charts

·        Chalkboard

·        Overhead transparencies

·        Computer-generated images such as Microsoft Power Point

 

Audio-visual aids:

·        VCRs using VHS tapes

·        CD-ROMs

·        DVDs

·        Tapes and audio discs

Observe the following principals in designing and constructing presentation aids.

 

·        MAKE IT EASY TO SEE! MAKE IT BIG ENOUGH FOR EVERYONE IN THE AUDIENCE TO SEE.

 

·        Keep it simple.

 

·        Select the right presentation aid, keeping in mind the audience size, your speech objective, your own skill and experience, and also know the room and the equipment that will be in the room you are speaking.

 

·        Do not use presentation aids that will shock or anger your

audience.

 

Follow these nine time-tested guidelines to effective presentation aid use:

 

·       Rehearse using your presentation aids.

·       Have eye contact with the audience, not the presentation aids.

·       Explain your presentation aids.

·       Not a good idea to pass objects among the audience. They will stop listening as soon as they receive the objects.

·       Use animals with caution for they are not predictable.

·       Use handouts effectively, and do not hand out during the speech as they will again stop listening and start reading.

·       Prepare and overhead transparency for each page of the handout.

·       Number the pages in your handout.

·       Time your visuals so you do not exceed the time limit.

·       Remove you presentation aids once you are finished.

·       Consider an assistant to help you.

·       Use technology effectively.

 

 

REMEMBER WHEN IT COMES TO USING VISUAL AIDS: MURPHY’S LAW APPLIES –(If something can go wrong, it will!).

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SOURCES:

 

Beebe, Steven., and Beebe, Susan. (2003). Public Speaking. “An Audience-Centered Approach. Fifth Edition. Pearson Education Inc. Boston, Mass.

 

Villagran, Morris; Wise, Charles and Ivy, Diana. (2003). Public Speaking. “An Audience Centered Approach”. Instructor’s Resource Manual for Beebe and Beebe. Pearson Education Inc. Boston, Mass.

 

http://www.abacon.com/pubspeak/index.html