FACULTY TEACHING WORKSHOP

Alterative Pedagogies OR

“An Audience-Centered Approach to Teaching”

 

Dr. Diane Howard

University of Calgary

Faculty of Communication and Culture

October 25th 2:00-3:30 pm

Room MFH 162

 

Diane Howard will be conducting October’s Faculty of Communication and Culture Teaching Workshop on “Alternative Pedagogies: An Audience-Centered Approach to Teaching”. Diane will share some tried and true pedagogical tips. Large classes can be interactive through the use of experiments, multi-media, the Internet and films to make the large lecture hall less intimidating for students and professors alike.

 

Hand Held Microphone:

 

Good afternoon!!!! My name is Diane. What is your name?

 

CRITIQUE:

 

What’s in a name? Juliet asked rhetorically? If Romeo had been a social scientist, he would have answered a great deal. Research has demonstrated that names are more than just a simple means of identification.

 

OVERHEAD:  They shape the way others think of us, the way we view ourselves, and the way we act, (Alder and Rodman, 2003)

 

OVERHEAD: The preconceptions we hold about people because of their names influence our behaviour toward them. (Alder and Rodman, 2003)

 

Let us examine the difference between knowing a students name and not knowing.

Let us examine the difference between calling myself Dr. Diane Howard and Diane.

I achieve the status and credibility of being a professor not by name but in non-verbal behaviour. I am always early for class, I always dress in a professional manner, I stand at the podium, and I am extremely well organized and rehearsed for each lecture.

 

Introduction: Good afternoon…and thank you for attending this seminar today. I am honoured and thrilled that you have taken the time out of your busy schedules to attend this seminar. Instead of shopping, going home to collapse and sleep, or having that early Friday afternoon martini…I hope to make this next hour and important one for you to learn some new techniques in the classroom.

 

SWITCH TO REMOTE MICROPHONE

 

CRITIQUE:

 

In case you did not notice, the seminar just switched from focusing on me to you- the audience. How do you become an audience-centered speaker?

 

http://www.abacon.com/pubspeak/index.html

 

http://www.acs.ucalgary.ca/~dhoward

 

Audience-centered public speaking requires you to find out as much as you can about the audience as individuals

 

Analyzing your audience is the process of examining information about the listeners you expect to hear your speech.

 

Audience adaptation is the process of ethically using the information you have gathered to achieve your speaking objectives.

 

JOKE:

 

CRITIQUE:

 

A joke helps to break any tension and allows students to settle in, open books, remove  the lid off of their coffee. It also signifies that the lecture is about to begin.

 

Let’s examine the student population as an audience.

 

OVERHEAD FIRST DAY OF CLASS

 

QUESTION: What students interested in?

 

QUESTION:  What are students thinking during a lecture?

 

 

CD/SONG: TIMBUK 3 “The Future’s So Bright I Gotta were Shades” -“1983 Pat MacDonald

 

CRITIQUE:

 

Maybe you think what I have done is inappropriate. But it is the bases of teaching what is a textual analysis. The aim of textual research is to describe and interpret the characteristics of a message. As you have witnessed, the term text does not have to be limited to written material. As social scientists and as scholars, we use the tem “textual analysis” to refer to any symbolic expression – verbal or non-verbal,(Griffin, 2003).

 

What have I done in the first 2-3 minutes of the first class?

 

·        I have introduced myself by my first name.

·        I have shown an interest in the students as individuals that deserve my attention and recognition.

·        I have shown appreciation that they have shown up for class.

·        I have explained that this will be a good hour invested of their time.

·        I have put all my notes on the Internet so they can participate in class instead of note taking.

·        The classroom becomes a friendly, non-threatening exciting place to learn and participate.

·        They have heard a new neat song

·        They have learned what a “textual analysis” is.

·        I HOPE I HAVE THEIR ATTENTION.

 

REMEMBER YOU NEVER HAVE A SECOND OPPORTUNITY TO MAKE A FIRST IMPRESSION. (Author unknown).

 

Research has shown that your student evaluations are based on the first ten minutes of your first class. (Felske, 2003)

 

BLACKBOARD EXERCISE: WHAT MAKES A GOOD TEACHER?

 

One of the oldest traditions in communication research – is the intensive study of a single message grounded in the humanistic perspective. (Griffin, 2003).

 

Dramaturgical Performance

 

VHS Dead Poet’s Society

 

Listening and being attentive:

 

http:www.acs.ucalgary.ca/~dhoward 

 

 

Ten key questions assist the audience–centered approach to public speaking.

 

 

1.    To who am I speaking?

2.    What does my audience expect from me?

3.    What topic would be most suitable for my audience?

4.    What is my objective?

5.    What kind of information should I share with my audience?

6.    How should I present the information to them?

7.    What kinds of examples would work best?

8.    What language differences do I have with my audience?

9.    What method of organizing information will be most effective?

(Beebe and Beebe, 2003).

 

Let’s examine the context of the communication event:

 

A large lecture hall does not necessarily equate to a pedagogical pit.

 

Large classes can be interactive with the use of experiments, multi-media, the Internet and films as observable phenomena to help students understand theoretical concepts. Let’s examine some pedagogical tips to make the large lecture hall less intimidating for students and professors alike.

 

Interactive Techniques:

          Tried to learn four or five names.

Created empathy Overhead: Student’s first day of class

Created a comfortable environment and sense of humour with a joke

Seamless use of technology and learning: Example of CD song and textual analysis

Participatory: Blackboard exercise to define the role of teacher

Self Disclosure: Students feel they “know” me after 30 lectures, even though they may never have actually talked to me. I therefore become “approachable”.

Seen parts of a movie.

Learned that all the lecture notes are on the Internet.

Learned academic information

·        Textual Analysis

·        Dramaturgical performance

·        Proxemics

·        Uncertainty Reduction Theory

Examine Review “Who wants to be an “A” student?”

 

 

Technology:

Hand Held Microphone:

Remote Microphone

Lap top

Ethernet Connection:

http://www.acs.ucalgary.ca/~dhoward

CD Boom Box:

CD-ROM Interactive

Blackboard exercise

Overheads Past and Present with reconstructions

Lights:

Screens:

VHS (Which I prefer to cue up rather than a DVD, which I find is too menu driven).

 

SPECIAL THANKS FOR TECHNICAL SUPPORT:

 

Keith Mills Com Media

Patrick McCurdy

Grace Reid

Sharon Lee

 

 

I call this form of teaching “Edutainment”.

 

WHO WANTS TO BE AN “A” STUDENT

 

__________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Sources:

 

Alder, Ronald, and Rodman, George. (2003). Understanding Human Communication. “Language”. Eighth Edition. Oxford University Press. Oxford, New York. Pp 77-78

 

Beebe, Steven., and Beebe, Susan. (2003). Public Speaking. “An Audience-Centered Approach. Fifth Edition. Pearson Education Inc. Boston, Mass.

 

Griffin, E.M. (2003). A First Look at Communication. Fifth Edition United States; McGraw-Hill Companies Inc.

 

http://www.abacon.com/pubspeak/index.html

 

http://www.acs.ucalgary.ca/~dhoward

 

TIMBUK 3 “The Future’s So Bright I Gotta were Shades” -“1983 Pat MacDonald

 

Villagran, Morris; Wise, Charles and Ivy, Diana. (2003). Public Speaking. “An Audience Centered Approach”. Instructor’s Resource Manual for Beebe and Beebe. Pearson Education Inc. Boston, Mass.

 

 

Zeuschner, Raymond. (1997). Communicating Today. Allyn and Bacon. Needham Heights, Massachusetts.